Thursday, May 6, 2010

Go Dylan, go!


Go Dylan, go. We wanna know. Set a fire below. Go Dylan, go.

I have learned more from watching the Dylan Ratigan Show about this financial mess than I ever have before. I, for one, want to thank him for working so hard to help inform the American taxpayer.

Dylan, yesterday, was talking about the worthless crap that the Fed has bought in the past. He named a few things but most of it almost no one knows about. We don't have a clue. We won't be happy when we do find out.

Also I saw a brief headline on Huff Post that stated that the Senate leadership may support breaking up the banks and auditing the Fed. Could this be true???? Is someone growing some gonads?? Are people like Dylan helping to get these things going??

68 comments:

jan said...

We took Lobie to the vet at noon today. The vet first did some blood tests to look at kidney and liver functions. Her Creatinine and liver function levels are all very high.Vet recommended x-rays. X-rays showed a big tumor in her belly - probably cancer with kidney and liver involvement. She recommended just giving her prednisone - no other treatment - just keeping her comfortable and giving her anything she wants to eat. If she becomes unable to get up or stops eating to give her a call. Its just a matter of time now.

jan said...

We are devastated.

Carol said...

Oh no Jan. I'm so sorry.

Coreen said...

Jan, I am so very sorry to hear your news about Lobie.

Chloe said...

Oh Jan, I felt heart broken when I just read about Lobie. I am so sorry.

thornwil said...

Jan,
I am so sorry to hear about Lobie. She will definitely be in my prayers.

Carol said...

When you bring a pet into your life, you begin a journey......a journey that
will bring you more love and devotion than you have ever known, yet also
test your strength and courage.

If you allow, the journey will teach you many things, about life, about
yourself, and most of all, about love. You will come away changed forever,
for one soul cannot touch another without leaving its mark.

Along the way, you will learn much about savoring life's simple pleasures...

Jumping in leaves, snoozing in the sun, the joys of puddles and even the
satisfaction of a good scratch behind the ears.

If you spend much time outside, you will be taught how to truly experience
every element, for no rock, leaf, or log will go unexamined, no rustling
bush will be overlooked, and even the very air will be inhaled, pondered,
and noted as being full of valuable information. Your pace may be slower
except when heading home to the food dish but you will become a better
naturalist, having been taught by an expert in the field.

Too many times we hike on automatic pilot, our goal being to complete the
trail rather than enjoy the journey. We miss the details...the colorful
mushrooms on the rotting log, the honeycomb in the old maple snag; the hawk
feather caught on a twig. Once we walk as a dog does, we discover a whole
new world.

Carol said...

We stop...we browse the landscape, we kick over leaves, peek in tree holes,
look up, down, all around. And we learn what any dog knows: that nature has
created a marvelously complex world that is full of surprises, that each
cycle of the seasons bring ever changing wonders, each day an essence all
its own.

Even from indoors you will find yourself more attuned to the world around
you. You will find yourself watching summer insects collecting on a
screen..(How bizarre they are! How many kinds there are! Or noting the
flick and flash of fireflies through the dark. You will stop to observe the
swirling dance of windblown leaves, or sniff the air after a rain. It does
not matter that there is no objective in this; the point is in the doing, in
not letting life's most important details slip by.

You will find yourself doing silly things that your pet-less friends might
not understand: spending thirty minutes in the grocery aisle looking for the
cat food brand your feline must have, buying dog birthday treats, or driving
around the block an extra time because your pet enjoys the ride. You will
roll in the snow, wrestle with chewy toys, bounce little rubber balls till
your eyes cross, and even run around the house trailing your bathrobe tie
with a cat in hot pursuit - all in the name of love.

Your house will become muddier and hairier. You will wear less dark clothing
and buy more lint rollers. You may find dog biscuits in your pocket or
purse, and feel the need to explain that an old plastic shopping bag adorns
your living room rug because your cat loves the crinkly sound.

You will learn the true measure of love...the steadfast, undying kind that
says, "It doesn't matter where we are or what we do, or how life treats us
as long as we are together." Respect this always. It is the most precious
gift any living soul can give another. You will not find it often among the
human race.

Carol said...

And you will learn humility. The look in my dog's eyes often made me feel
ashamed. Such joy and love at my presence. She saw not some flawed human who
could be cross and stubborn, moody or rude, but only her wonderful
companion. Or maybe she saw those things and dismissed them as mere human
foibles, not worth considering, and so chose to love me anyway.

If you pay attention and learn well, when the journey is done, you will be
not just a better person, but the person your pet always knew you to be –
the one they were proud to call beloved friend.

I must caution you that this journey is not without pain. Like all paths of
true love, the pain is part of loving. For as surely as the sun sets, one
day your dear animal companion will follow a trail you cannot yet go down.
And you will have to find the strength and love to let them go. A pet's
time on earth is far too short - especially for those that love them. We
borrow them, really, just for awhile, and during these brief years they are
generous enough to give us all their love, every inch of their spirit and
heart, until one day there is nothing left.

The cat that only yesterday was a kitten is all too soon old and frail and
sleeping in the sun. The young pup of boundless energy wakes up stiff and
lame, the muzzle now gray. Deep down we somehow always knew that this
journey would end. We knew that if we gave our hearts they would be broken.

But give them we must for it is all they ask in return. When the time comes,
and the road curves ahead to a place we cannot see, we give one final gift
and let them run on ahead - young and whole once more.

Carol said...

That came from:

http://www.milagropets.org/WhyWeRescueMilagroSeniorPetRefugeInc./7/#journey

Solar said...

Jan, Truly sorry honey.!

Ivy Green said...

Jan,

Such sad news. I know you are "listening to Lobie." She will let you know when she is ready. She does not want you to suffer.

Coreen said...

The looming disaster coming ashore in Louisiana...

"In good times & bad, New Orleans has always had a talent for living for the moment. So with oil from a gushing well in the Gulf of Mexico looming offshore, people here are buying & eating as much seafood as they can as fast as they can."

A threat creeping toward the pantry

Coreen said...

And here's something else to consider....

Do women make better doctors?

And my answer is yes...they are more thorough, they listen, are not condescending and they don't seem to have that "god complex"....(& yes there are good male doctors, but I still prefer women doctors for the reasons mentioned)

jan said...

Thanks to all of you for your very kind words.

Carol, I love the pomes. I will share them with John. So much that is said in them is so true. Lobie teaches us so much about living in in the present.

I called my 3 sons and the grandchildren today to tell them about Lobie. They have all loved Lobie too. Tonight our middle son and his family came over to spend some time with us and with Lobie. Our 8 year old GD cried and cried. She has known Lobie all of her 8 young years. The 2 older children (20 & 17) got down on the floor with Lobie and gently patted her as well. I took some pictures of all of them together. It was a very loving time and one I will treasure.

Ivy, I know this is a tough time for you with your Meg being not too well either. I have been reading "snippits" of the past few days comments. How is Meg?

Ivy Green said...

Jan,
Thank you for thinking about Meg during your own difficulties. Meg is doing better. She has been taking Atopica since Tuesday along with antibiotics. The main side effect is nausea but hopefully that will subside. The vet says for all of her many problems, Meg is really a trooper. She said there are many dogs (and owners) who would have given up a long time ago.

Ivy Green said...

We (and our vets) are of the same mind with our dogs, it's about "their" quality of life, not about our hanging on for "our" sake. Our dogs always let us know when to keep going and when to stop; and they've trusted us to listen to them.

Ivy Green said...

Jan,
It is wise of you to take pictures of Lobie now and start "telling her story." She has a great story.

We collected all the mementos of our first Scottie (a rescue), her collar and tags, her favorite blanket, and some of her fur. Those items still bring us comfort and good memories. I also had a wonderful "dog whisperer" friend who could hear her "speak" and let me know what she was feeling. That helped a lot, especially on the good days. That is what taught me to listen to the dogs.

Carol said...

"SENATE VOTES IN FAVOR OF WALL STREET
Amendment Allowing Breakup Of Big Banks Voted Down"

Yeah, that's more like what I expected.

Carol said...

Jan, I'm sorry that little pome or whatever it was, was so long but I couldn't come up with any words myself to describe how I felt about what you are going thru. When I found that, it pretty much said what I felt and it being long was also appropriate since it usually takes me forever, also, to say what I'm thinking. I could see a little bit of all of us in it.

I did hold Maggie a lot yesterday.

Carol said...

Ya know what is interesting? Listening to and reading the news, the people running our government remind me so much of the people I see in jail every day. They keep making the same mistakes over and over and just don't get it. Most don't give a crap about us. They had a list of how much of an increase in the money those banks lobbiest are giving out right now. They listed Goldman as having a 70% increase in spending on lobbying. Since they are giving it out, someone must be taking it. No shame. I guess they are using our money to lobby against us.

Carol said...

And Jan, that pome came from a rescue dog site and I know Lobie is a rescue dog. I think of all rescue dogs as angels looking for some humans to watch over. Their time here on earth is just orientation. When they leave here, they get their wings.

Coreen said...

Just in time for Mother's Day, irresistible
pics (the first 19 are mom & babies, then lots
of other animal pics)

Animal Tracks-Mother's Day Edition

Carol said...

Jan, that was such a sweet image you shared with us last night, of the family gathered around their Lobie, letting her know how much she is loved.

Chloe said...

... yes Jan, thank you for sharing your evening with us. It sounds like you have a wonderful family. Hope Lobie is not suffering this morning.

Chloe said...

Really nice pics Coreen. The one of the mama and baby ducks reminded me that I keep forgetting to ask Carol how their baby ducks are doing.

I meant to ask for the last few days Carol, but never did (for some reason). Are they all OK?

Chloe said...

Americans are being "bombarded" with cancer-causing chemicals and radiation and the federal government must do far more to protect them, presidential cancer advisers said on Thursday.

"Although most experts agree that as many as two-thirds of cancer cases are caused by lifestyle choices like smoking, poor diet and lack of exercise, the two-member panel said many avoidable cancers were also caused by pollution, radon gas from the soil and medical imaging scans.

The American people -- even before they are born -- are bombarded continually with myriad combinations of these dangerous exposures,they wrote in a letter to President Barack Obama at top of the report."

The panel urges you most strongly to use the power of your office to remove the carcinogens and other toxins from our food, water, and air that needlessly increase healthcare costs, cripple our nation's productivity, and devastate American lives." http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6450LN20100506

Chloe said...

Giant box close to being over oil-spewing well
"A mission to the bottom of the sea to try to avert a wider environmental disaster progressed early Friday as crews said a 100-ton concrete-and-steel box was close to being placed over a blown-out well on the Gulf floor in an unprecedented attempt to capture gushing oil.

We are facing an evolving situation........ The possibility remains that the BP oil spill could turn into an unprecedented environmental disaster. The possibility remains that it will be somewhat less.

Meanwhile, a six-member board composed of representatives of the Coast Guard and the federal Minerals Management Service will begin investigating the accident next week.

And a federal judicial panel in Washington has been asked to consolidate at least 65 potential class-action lawsuits claiming economic damage from the spill. Commercial fishermen, business and resort owners, charter boat captains, even would-be vacationers have sued from Texas to Florida, seeking damages that could reach into the billions.

"It's just going to kill us. It's going to destroy us," said Dodie Vegas, who owns a motel and cabins in Grand Isle, La., and has seen 10 guests cancel. http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100507/ap_on_bi_ge/us_gulf_oil_spill


"Wildlife, habitats and livelihoods are all under pressure as oil from the Deepwater Horizon rig reaches the Louisiana coast. Mud core samples are being taken by marine biologists, fishermen are re-employed to take oil booms out to sea and conservation groups rush to protect nesting least terns" http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/may/06/deepwater-horizon-oil-spill-oil-spills?picture=362271866

Coreen said...

Let's hope that cap works....& the dire long term consequences are avoided...the loss of
the local seafood to Louisianans way of life
would be significant....as pointed out in
the NYT article...

Chloe, just for Texans...have no idea
where U.S. 281 runs in relation to you...but
someone thinks its worth the ride....north/south from Oklahoma to Brownsville at the Rio Grande....

but for a 300 mile stretch through its Texas midsection (from Glen Rose to San Antonio) U.S. 281 makes for a beautiful & intriguing road trip....

Get Your Texas Kicks on U.S. 281

Chloe said...

Thanks Coreen, I'll check that out - I'm not sure where it is either. (I'll read the link next).

"I saw a brief headline on Huff Post that stated that the Senate leadership may support breaking up the banks and auditing the Fed. Could this be true???? Is someone growing some gonads??"

Carol, I found something on this last night (haven't looked today yet):
Senate Liberals Push for Strict Financial Rules
"Liberal Democrats in the Senate, emboldened by a wave of populism, are trying to make financial regulatory legislation far tougher on Wall Street, potentially restricting or breaking up the biggest banks and financial companies, David M. Herszenhorn reports in The New York Times.

Normally such efforts might attract little concern among Senate leaders or the White House. But the confluence of a high-stakes election year and a pervasive anti-Wall Street sentiment after the recession has given liberals unusual muscle in the debate. It has also raised the prospect that they could succeed in reshaping the bill.

Other senators acknowledged that they were driven by years of conviction that tougher rules were needed for big banks and Wall Street.

“It is time that we pull the sharks out of the tank,” said Ms. Mikulski, who is one of six senators still in office who voted against repealing Glass-Steagall in 1999. “Make sure the whales do not crush the little guy, and make sure that the minnows get a chance and that we have an economy that is swimming.” http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/06/senate-liberals-push-for-strict-financial-rules/

Chloe said...

"Eccentricity, weirdness and historical arcana are common on U.S. 281."

... yep, he got the essence of Texas Coreen...Ha!

It's quite a bit north of us, but I'm marking it in case we get to a point where we have some time for an interesting little drive. I think it said it goes into Austin, and we've only been there a couple of times.

Chloe said...

Eccentric and weird - he may have been talking about me. :)

Coreen said...

Only crossed Texas one time...from New Mexico through Dallas/Fort Worth on the way to New
Orleans...at that time the marked difference
going west to east....flat, arid land, with not much growing, then in the distance
loomed Dallas/Fort Worth...huge citylife...then
the surroundings changed to more green, lush as you went further east on into Louisiana....and crossing Lake Pontchatrain bridge was an experience in itself...& I've crossed lots of bridges....

Chloe said...

I just had to come back and tell you, Jan - I've been thinking about Lobie, and have felt so awful since I heard about her tumor last night. I know how much she means to you, John and the rest of your family. She is such a sweet dog - and you have given her so much love and a wonderful home.

I read a while back that 10-12 years is the average life expectancy for larger dogs, although the small ones live a few years longer (on the average). It is so hard to deal with our pets having a shorter life span than us - my heart has been broken so many times.

These things have a way of bringing back the losses we have all suffered through, and I think that's one reason everyone here understands and shares your grief. I'm fairly sure that the Prednisone you're giving her will make her feel better for a while - I'm guessing she will be quite comfortable for a while. Please keep us informed on how's she's doing.

Chloe said...

Coreen, We live about 15 minutes of the Sam Houston National Forest, as well as Lake Conroe (and about a half hour, or so, further to Lake Livingston). Our area is considered the Piney woods section of Tx., but we have more oaks on our property than pines. We're lucky to have found an area that they've left most of the trees up.

I've seen some areas of Texas, when we drove into the state from California, that looked more the way some people picture the state. Driving into El Paso was downright scary. You've got to remember what a huge state this is, and it's somewhat like a few different states rolled into one.

jan said...

Coreen, in reference to one of your earlier comments, I agree that women are better docs. I have had some good male docs, but they do not listen to me like the women do. When I was going through menopause I must have gone through 5 different docs (one was a woman) trying to find one that did not push the hormone replacement therapy - this was before 2002 when the news hit about the bad effects of HRT. I had done my own library search on HRT and knew I didn't want to take it. I had one creepy doc stroke my arm and say "you want to keep this beautiful skin, don't you (one of his reasons to take HRT." I nearly vomited.

jan said...

I do have a male doc now. He is Japanese American and he is great. He takes his time, listens to me and explains every thing. He is a friend too. John and I met him at the University pool. When I need a pap smear, he has the NP in the office do it - bless him.

jan said...

Chloe, thank you so much. Yes, I have known that Lobie would not be around too many more years. She has been so healthy that I thought we were cheating father time with her. When we left her on Sat she had been on a 2 mile walk with John and was eating her food heartily and doing her little dance when it was time to eat or go for a walk. Since returning on wed afternoon she is so different. She won't touch her regular dog food and will only eat 2 or 3 bites of chicken and rice at a time. She lays around all the time. Since yesterday evening we can get her to get up and go outside but she has piddled and pooped in the house about 5 times since we brought her home on wed. She rarely did that before. I think you are right, the prednisone is making a difference.

jan said...

Carol, your pome was not too long. I have gone back and read it several times and each time I find something else in it that is comforting. I have had to wipe the tears off my keyboard. I thank you for bringing the pome to the blog. Thanks for holding onto Maggie. That is so sweet. I can just picture you two together.

jan said...

Ivy, You are such an inspiration with your stories of Meg. She must be an amazing animal companion.

I have done some "whispering" with Lobie over the years. I do believe she hears me too. One of our granddaughters, when she was about 2-3 years old (in Arkansas) loved Lobie so much she would get right in her face and try to kiss her. The 1st time she did this, Lobie was a young dog and growled at her (one of only 2 times that I am aware she has ever growled at a person). I got down and said into her ear several times (Lobie's ear) "you are not to growl, or even think about hurting a child, ever again" I said it several times and she never did it again. When this little grandhild was around however, Lobie managed to disappear, until the GC was older.

jan said...

Chloe, you live in one of the prettiest parts of Texas. It sounds beautiful in your part of the country.

jan said...

Ivy, Lobie has listened to us over the years - now we need to listen to her.

Carol said...

Jan, I also read that pome several times and cried. My little Asbergers didn't even notice. Lobie would have comforted me, I bet. I think Maggie's having been abandoned left her a little cold. Can't write
much, on Iphony.

Coreen said...

Jan, Having lived with cats for as long as I can remember, and listening to your thoughts
about Lobie, reminds me of the happiness & yes,in the end, the pain (when having to let one of them go) that each of my fur family gave us...I know that you will do the best for Lobie for as long as is needed...

Coreen said...

Carol,

Here's the most recent update of what the
Senate did last night re: financial reform...
will be surprised if your guy Dylan, is not
on a rant today about it....

1. Sen. Bernie Sanders agreed to water down his amendment to audit the fed...(something the White House wanted)

2. The Brown/Kaufman amendment to limit the size of big banks was voted down 33-61....

The fate of the Consumer Financial Protection
Agency remains to be determined....

Populism challenged in Wall Street reform
bill

Carol said...

Some reasons for stock market fall from Ratigan: "Wallstreet is a house of cards built on leverage."..."Very little capital in our capitalism." " Wallstreet gambling with the free money from the Federal Reserve, printing away, and creating a false ecomony which yesterday showed can come tumbling down at any time for any reason"....

He says that our market is little more than accounting fraud and money printing from the Federal Reserve.

That's why folkes we can't have any transparency. It's all a nasty fantasy, one that keeps the bad guys rich and the rest of us either dirt poor or paying to keep the rich guys rich. We really can't handle the truth! "Yesterday we got insight into just how bad it is.." Ratigan says.

I can only listen to Ratigan for short periods because, in my older age, I just can't take horror stories. The only problem is, is that I feel that I have to know. If you have a penny in your pocket left, you better try to understand some of this shit.

C2C has had a significant number of programs on this financial crisis. And those programs are scarier than the programs about the Chupacabra.

Dylan also says that a market that is down 1000 points for no reason is actually not a market, it's a joke. I'd say, not a funny joke.

Coreen said...

It's another beautiful evening...hope you are
enjoying the start of the weekend...

I saw a bit of Dylan's show when I got home...I keep telling you...we are doomed, no one is really protecting us...just do what you need to protect you & yours as much as you can...

Yesterdays' wall street drop only exposed more
of the legal but dubious workings...black boxes
that can do 10,000 trades in a nano-second...doesn't give much chance for the little guy, other than getting lucky in one's
gamble on whatever stock you choose...remember
the terminator movies...the beginning is here...

But it is the weekend & can't let them get the
best of us...

Coreen said...

I miss the chupacabras....

Checked C2C tonite someone talking about demons & evil...appropriate discussion, in light of the state of the world....

Coreen said...

the 1,000 point plunge...still not sure what caused it....scarier than our chupacabra....

From Politico:
According to the government official, investigators have traced the calamity back to the trades in Chicago, which were picked up by automated trading computers in New York.

The New York computers in turn issued a series of sell orders, which had a cascading effect on the Dow as even more programs picked up on the trading and issued their own sell orders.

When the New York Stock Exchange slowed down its computerized trading in response to the sell-off, sellers turned to other exchanges. That increased volatility in the markets was in turn picked up by computerized algorithms, which executed even more sell orders.

“They can see on the tape what made it more volatile,” the government official said. “They can see what the accelerators were. What they don’t know is what set the whole chain in motion. They’re still a few links in the chain away from that.”

The decision by the NYSE to slow down trading Thursday has set off a furious debate between the exchanges over what would have been the right course of action in response to the market drop.

And the breathtaking 1,000-point drop has also heightened calls to regulate so-called high frequency trading, in which buyers and sellers use ultrafast computers to trade in and out of stocks in fractions of a second. Critics say such lightning-quick trading increases volatility in the market and can make a sell-off much worse in a crisis.

Carol said...

Yes Coreen, the house of cards just takes a light breeze to bring it all down, but you are right, after 5p on Friday it's denial time and not that river in Africa, but a river in lazy Louziana.

Life is good, we are all rich, at least in great blogs friends, and all is well with the world. Love, love, love. Talking bout love, love, love.

Carol said...

And an evening to pretend like this seasoned floured Angus cubed steak I fried up ain't gonna kill me. Probably not tonight anyway.

Carol said...

But before I go down for the count, here is Dylan Ratigan's list of who is in the new
Bankster party and who is in the People's party. You need to know!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dylan-ratigan/is-your-senator-a-bankste_b_567907.html

Carol said...

I couldn't find Louisiana on the list. Is there something someone forgot to tell me?

Carol said...

I guess they got lost in an oil slick.

Chloe said...

.... this is the one I meant to link yesterday: Oil slick reaches Louisiana's barrier islands

"The islands are very vibrant places," said Kelby Ouchley, a temporary manager at the Interior Department's wildlife refuge visitors center in Venice, La. He described the islands, mostly sand, mud and grass, as "places where thousands of birds are wheeling and whirling around you. You see pelicans toting big limbs to make nests and peregrine falcons flying over. It is rife with life." Oil slick reaches Louisiana's barrier islands

Chloe said...

And this one from Ivy's Alabama today:

Oil stays offshore, but slick could hit Mississippi islands today

"The Alabama coast continued its waiting game Friday as a massive oil slick stayed offshore, and well owner BP PLC took its best near-term shot at containing the estimated 210,000 gallons of oil gushing into the Gulf each day.

The latest projection from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration calls for oil to make landfall along Mississippi's barrier islands as early as today. The 72-hour projection calls for no oil landfall along the Alabama coastline before Monday." Oil stays offshore, but slick could hit Mississippi islands today

Chloe said...

Emma fell and hit her chin and forehead really hard against the railing of a wood chair late yesterday, her eyes rolled back and it knocked her out for a few seconds. I grabbed her up from her grampa, and turned her toward the floor like I do when she's choking and she came right to, but we rushed her to emergency, just in case. They gave her a Cat Scan, and everything was clear - so I didn't have to spend the whole night worrying, but still, I'm watching her closely.

You can't imagine how I felt when all of this happened. It made me realize even more (is that possible?) how much I love her, and plain scared the hell out of me. My life is never going to be the same with her in the world. It's so much better.

Carol said...

How scary Chloe. I'm glad she is OK. Now that she is up and walking and has more territory that she can cover, there's more to worry about.

Coreen said...

Oh, Chloe, what a frightening incident...relieved to hear that it was not serious in the end, but am quite sure that at
the time it was devastating...

I often wonder how moms manage to let their
little ones 'grow up', knowing that you have to
let them do things, even at the risk of something happening....

Chloe said...

I know what you mean Coreen. You can't be overly protective, or they'll grow up fearful. This was a freak accident, but it sure did make me think. I can't figure out how people cope when they lose a baby or young child to illness, or accident.

I saw a picture a few months ago of a beautiful little 2 yr. girl who died in one of those playpens with the changing station - it fell on her and choked her somehow (that model was recalled afterwards). I had trouble even looking at her picture and imagining anything so awful happening to one so young, innocent and beautiful. Freak accidents take a lot of lives.

I've heard and read of some terrifying stories, but, I'm determined not to taint her view of life with too much worrying.

... she's doing well this morning, and so everything is back to normal. The scare is over with and we're moving on. (btw, they were great at emergency - first time I've ever had a good experience there. It only took about an hour - thank goodness it wasn't late at night when the crowds arrive.

jan said...

Chloe, How terribly scary that was for you. I am so glad that Emma is ok. Kids do take falls and Emma will fall again, but to have her lose consciousness is so terrifying. I am so glad they have technology like Cat scans and others to get more definite information. I have taught pediatric nursing and am amazed at how resilient children are and how fast they heal. I am thinking about you. This is a good time to -breathe in and breathe out-.

Lobie is not with us any longer. It is so hard to say the word "died" She began crying yesterday evening so pitifully and writhing so badly that we rushed her to an emergency animal hospital - our vets office had just closed. They immediately gave her something IV to make her more comfortable and after it began to wear off she was crying again (almost like a child's cry) so we made the decision to get her a terminal injection. John and I have cried until we think there are no tears left and then when we think about her - we cry again. We are taking care of each other and will be fine.

jan said...

Carol, I am going to go back and read your pomes again.

jan said...

Chloe, I am so happy you had a good experience in emergency.

John and I went out for breakfast this morning and we were talking about our own grief. We have neither one lost a child but we have both had friends who have. I cannot imagine that kind of grief.

Chloe said...

Jan, Now I'm crying too. You did the right thing. I'm sending much love your way, to both you and John. Thank goodness you have each other.

Chloe said...

... there's a guy over at TM that says that some things are worse than dying. And being in that kind of pain is one of them.

Carol said...

I'm so sorry for you and John, Jan. I'm crying too. Lobie is still with you but she now has her wings. We can rejoice for Lobie, she's free. Free to watch over you guys. She wanted to wait until she could say, see ya later, to the family and then she told you it was time. I'm glad she didn't have to suffer very long. It would have been much harder if she would have had to linger much longer. She didn't want to do that to you guys.

Ivy Green said...

Jan,
I am extremely saddened to learn of the loss of Lobie. I hope maybe we can put up a tribute page here to her memory. Maybe a reprise of the thread where you "told her story" and shared some of the milestones of her life? Whatever would bring you some comfort in your time of loss. Or maybe if you are ready to "move on" that's okay too. Just let us know.

Carol said...

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